Gemstones - Discover the undiscovered

For the gemstone jewelry enthusiasts, let us shed some light on the gemstones world. We are, in Inbar Fine Jewellery, always strive to seek the finest pieces of color we can obtain. From rich rare unheated Sapphires to Burmese Rubies and electric Paraiba Tourmaline our collection is sure to have something designed to satisfy even the most ambitious collector.

The traditional classification which goes back to ancient Greeks begins with a distinction between precious and semi-precious, similar distinctions are made in other cultures. In modern use, the precious stones are diamond, ruby, sapphire, and emerald, with all other gemstones being semi-precious.

In modern times gemstones are identified by gemologists, who describe gems and their characteristics using technical terminology specific to the field of gemology. The first characteristic a gemologist uses to identify a gemstone is its chemical composition. For example, diamonds are made of carbon (C) and rubies of aluminum oxide (Al2O3). Next, many gems are crystals which are classified by their crystal system such as cubic or trigonal or monoclinic. Another term used is a habit, the form the gem is usually found in. For example, diamonds, which have a cubic crystal system, are often found as octahedrons.

Gemstones are classified into different groups, species, and varieties. For example, ruby is the red variety of the species corundum, while any other color of corundum is considered sapphire. Other examples are the emerald (green), aquamarine (blue), red beryl (red), goshenite (colorless), heliodor (yellow) and morganite (pink), which are all varieties of the mineral species beryl.

Gems are characterized in terms of refractive index, dispersion, specific gravity, hardness, cleavage, fracture, and luster. They may exhibit pleochroism or double refraction. They may have luminescence and a distinctive absorption spectrum.
Material or flaws within a stone may be present as inclusions.
Gemstones may also be classified in terms of their "water". This is a recognized grading of the gem's luster, transparency, or "brilliance".Very transparent gems are considered "first water", while "second" or "third water" gems are those of a lesser transparency.